Syllabus

New York College of Technology – Department of Entertainment Technology – Emerging Media Technology

Topics and Perspectives in Emerging Media
Course Code: MTEC 3140-D294 (46886)

Spring 2018/ Monday/Wednesday
12 -1:40

Scheduled Location:
300 Jay Street,
Room V-321
(718) 260-5588
Instructor: Chloe Smolarski
E-mail:
chloe.smolarski@gmail.com
csmolarski@citytech.cuny.edu

Office Hour:
Wednesday 2-3 PM

Course Description:

This roundtable seminar will introduce students to conceptual frameworks in the field of New Media and Studies of Emerging Technology through a series of readings, which include articles, books and essays that explore technology and its broader implications on society, ethics and cultural production. The seminar is divided into roughly five parts:

  • Media Transformations: the Mechanical and Digital
  • Singularity, Artificial Intelligence and What it Means to be Human
  • The Ethics Behind Data, Algorithms and New Economic Currencies
  • Anthropocene: Technological Perspectives and Beyond on the Environment, Biology and Medicine
  • Inventing the Future: Speculative Fiction, Games and Collaborative Storytelling

Through close reads, critical analysis and discussions, students will write in response to notions surfacing around emerging technology. They will also be expected to contextualize their own cultural production and consumption within a theoretical framework. 

In addition to a comparative essay, a final technical paper, and a collaborative story writing project, each student is expected to present the main ideas of a particular text and to lead the class discussion at least once. Students will also write weekly response papers. Throughout the semester the class will function as an incubator, nurturing discussion, and the sharing of ideas as we collectively deconstruct notions of the future and the agency that we have in creating tomorrow’s world.

Course Objectives:

By the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Demonstrate an ability to write both an analytical paper and a technical paper.

2. Demonstrate an improved ability to discuss complex ideas and put them into a theoretical framework.   

3. Demonstrate a capacity to read, deconstruct and debate texts from the field of New Media and Technology.

4. Demonstrate facility in the process of creative thinking, collaboration and the iterative process.

8. Demonstrate an ability to analyze texts and to to apply obtained knowledge to other contexts

Attendance Policy:

This class follows New York City College of Technology attendance policy. If a student is absent s/he is expected to make up the work in a timely fashion. If a student knows in advance that they will not be able to attend please inform the instructor via email. While it is understood that people are not always able to come to class due to illness or the equivalent, it is critical that the student understand that is scaffolded and that it is their responsibility to learn the materials they have missed.

Course Outline:

Week

Date

Readings/Projects

Media Transformations – The Mechanical and Digital

1

Lev Manovich – The Language of New Media –

“How Media Became New” pg 21-27

The Principles of New Media pg 27- 48

2

Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction

Walter Benjamin

Baroque Technopatriarchy: Reproducton (Art Forum)

Singularity, Artificial Intelligence and What it Means to be Human

3

A Cyborg Manifesto: Science Technology and Socialist Feminism

Donna Haraway

Nick Bostrom http://www.nickbostrom.com/

4

And

5

Computing Machinery and Intelligence – Alan Turing –

The state of MACHINE LEARNING

Trevor Paglyn

The Ethics Behind Data, Algorithms and New Economic Currencies

6

Big Data

Is AlphaZero really a scientific breakthrough in AI? 

Jose Camacho Collados

Propublica’s

Bias in Criminal Risk Scores Is Mathematically Inevitable, Researchers Say 

by Julia Angwin and Jeff Larson

7

Economics –

CLOUDISM LIBRARY STACK ON BLOCKCHAIN ARCHIVES AND LIBRARY FUTURES

How Blockchain Technology Will Impact the Digital Economy 

by Christian Catalini

Midterm Exam – Comparative Essay

Anthropocene: Technological Perspectives and Beyond on the Environment, Biology and Medicine

8

Vandana Shiva – GMO

Critical Art Ensemble

http://www.critical-art.net/books/molecular/

Synthetic biology -Why it Matters

Alistair Elfick and Drew Endy

Harnessing Gene Technology

George Church – biomedicine

9

Enter the Anthropocene—Age of Man

Elizabeth Kolbert

10

 Art in the Anthropocene

Diplomacy in the Face of Gaia Bruno Latour in conversation with Heather Davis

In Catastrophic Times Isabelle StrengersThe Intrusion of Gaia ch 4 pg 43-50.

11

A Few Rules For Predicting The Future- Octavia Butler

Culture shift: redirecting humanity’s path to a flourishing future

JEREMY LENT 20 March 2018

Inventing the Future: Speculative Fiction, Games and Collaborative Storytelling

Blood Child by Octavia Butler

Collaborative writing

12

Collaborative writing cont.

Brainstorming, ideation and writing

13

Ursala LeGuin

A Parade in Ehrenrang

Robin Hunicke, Marc LeBlanc, Robert Zubek “MDA: A Formal Approach to Game Design and Game Research.”

14

Collaborative Storytelling Presentations

15

Final Papers (Technical Paper) due

Final Grade Calculations:

20 %

Participation

20 %

Reading responses

15%

Presentations

15 %

Collaborative storytelling project

15 %

Comparative essay (midterm)

15 %

Final paper

Grading Standards:

Students will be graded on the quality of their individual work, their leadership and ability to contribute concepts and work productively towards group projects. Mastery of the technical tools and effective documentation will be also seriously taken into consideration. Critiques and discussions are an integral part of the class. Students should demonstrate an ability to communicate complex ideas about their own work, the work of other students, and provided articles and readings. Participating online is not only encouraged but required!

Grading and Evaluation

Students’ ability to meet the course’s learning outcomes will be evaluated based on the following criteria:

• evidence of understanding course
material

• quality of work as evidenced in the required writing assignment 

• participation in class

• attendance in class and timely completion of response papers

A

4.0; 96 –100%

Work of exceptional quality, which often goes beyond the stated goals of the course

A-

3.7; 91 – 95%

Work of very high quality

B+

3.3; 86–90%

Work of high quality that indicates substantially higher than average abilities

B

3.0; 81–85%

Very good work that satisfies the goals of the course

B-

2.7; 76–80%

Good work

C+

2.3; 71–75%

Above-average work

C-

1.7; 61–65%

Passing work but below good academic standing

D

1.0; 46–60%

Below-average work that indicates a student does not fully understand the assignments; Probation level

 

though passing for credit

F

0.0; 0–45%

Failure, no credit

W

Grade of W

 

 

 

Advertisements